Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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708.430.2020

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"As always my visit was pleasant, I always feel as if I am visiting with long time friends when I am in the office . Dr Miller listens and explains thoroughly and I never feel rushed or ignored"


Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

MammographyMamograf­a

Mammography

Mammography is an x-ray exam of breast tissue. The image produced is called a mammogram. A mammogram can help detect problems with your breasts, such as cysts or cancer.

Before Your Test

  • Schedule the test for one week after your period, when your breasts are less tender.

  • Make sure your clinic gets your last mammogram if it was done somewhere else. This lets the doctor compare the two.

  • On the morning of your test, wash your breasts and underarms, but don't use deodorant, powder, or perfume.

  • Wear a top that you can remove easily.

Technician and patient

During Your Test

  • You will need to undress from the waist up.

  • The technologist will position your breast to get the best test results.

  • Each of your breasts will be compressed. This helps get the most complete x-ray image.

After Your Test

  • More x-rays are sometimes needed. You'll be called to schedule them.

  • You should be notified of your test results in writing. Ask about this on the day of your appointment.

  • Have mammograms as often as your healthcare provider recommends. Also be sure to do regular breast self-exams.

Let the technologist know if:

  • You're pregnant or think you may be.

  • You have breast implants.

  • You have any scars or moles on or near your breasts.

  • You've had a breast biopsy or surgery.

  • You're breastfeeding.

 

Publication Source: Breastcancer.org

Publication Source: Radiological Society of North America

Publication Source: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services

Online Source: Breastcancer.org

Online Source: Radiological Society of North America

Online Source: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services

Date Last Reviewed: 2004-10-21T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2004-10-01T00:00:00-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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