Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse: After SurgeryProlapso del organo p©lvico: Despu©s de la cirug­a

Pelvic Organ Prolapse: After Surgery

You may go home the day of surgery, or you may stay in the hospital for 1 or more days. The length of your stay is based on the surgery you had.

Cutaway view of bladder
A suprapubic  catheter carries urine out of your bladder through an incision in your abdomen.

Cutaway view of bladder
A Foley catheter carries urine out of your bladder through your urethra.

Catheter, Drain, and IV

After surgery, it may be hard for you to urinate for a few days or weeks. A catheter (thin tube) helps drain your bladder. You may have a Foley catheter, which is put into the bladder through the urethra, or a suprapubic catheter, which is put into the bladder through a small incision in your abdomen. The catheter may be removed while you are in the hospital, or it may stay in place for a few days after you go home. Tubes may drain fluid from your incision. Intravenous (IV) lines give you fluids and medications. If you have a vaginal incision, you may have gauze packing in your vagina for 24 hours.

Returning Home

Your doctor will tell you when you can leave the hospital. An adult friend or family member should drive you home. When you get home, care for yourself as instructed and schedule any needed follow-up visits with your doctor.

Managing Pain

A nurse can give you medication to control pain. Or, you may have a PCA (patient-controlled analgesia) pump attached to your IV line. This pump lets you give yourself pain medication. It is normal to feel some pain. But if the pain bothers you, tell your nurse right away. If you go home soon after surgery, you will have a prescription for pain medication to take with you. Call your doctor if this medication doesn't relieve your pain.

Going Home with a Catheter

If you are still using the catheter when you leave the hospital, you may be told to:

  • Keep the catheter and the skin around it clean.

  • Clamp a suprapubic catheter to see whether you can urinate on your own. Then, measure the urine that drains from the catheter after you urinate.

Getting Out of Bed

You may be asked to get up and walk a little before you leave the hospital. Walking keeps your blood moving and helps prevent blood clots. Once you can get out of bed, you may be helped to the bathroom to see if you can urinate on your own. When you can stand on your own, you may be able to take a shower.

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T08:38:16-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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