Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Nonsurgical TreatmentProlapso del ³rgano p©lvico: Tratamiento sin cirug­a

Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Nonsurgical Treatment

Image of pessary
Two types of pessaries

If your pelvic organ prolapse is mild or doesn't bother you much, nonsurgical treatment may be a good choice. A device (pessary) to wear in your vagina can help ease your symptoms. You may also be given certain exercises (Kegels) to do. And you may need to make some lifestyle changes.

Image of pessary inserted
Wearing a pessary can help support any prolapsed organs.

Wearing a Pessary

A pessary helps support the prolapsed organ or organs. It is specifically fitted by your doctor. A pessary may ease your symptoms, but it can't repair prolapse. The pessary must be removed for cleaning. If you can't do this, you will need to see your doctor regularly. He or she will remove and clean your pessary. If you have questions or concerns about the pessary, be sure to talk with your doctor.

Image of woman
You can do Kegels at any time, such as when you're talking on the phone.

Doing Kegels

Kegels are simple exercises that you can do to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. They may ease your symptoms and prevent further prolapse. To do a Kegel, contract your pelvic floor muscles as if to stop the urine stream. (Do this when you're not urinating.) Ask your doctor how many Kegels to do and how long to hold each one. During your treatment visits, your health care provider may place a device in your vagina to measure your Kegel contractions. That way, you can find out whether you are doing Kegel exercises right.

Living a Healthy Life

Improving your health may ease your symptoms or keep your problem from worsening. You may be asked to:

  • Quit smoking to prevent excessive coughing

  • Adjust medications that may cause urine leakage

  • Avoid lifting, which puts pressure on pelvic muscles

  • Exercise and eat well to maintain a healthy weight

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T08:38:15-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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