Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

LumpectomyTilectom­a (tumorectom­a)

Lumpectomy

Lumpectomy is surgery to remove cancer. It's a breast-conserving surgery, which means your breast remains intact. If you're having a lumpectomy, you'll probably also have radiation therapy.

Cutaway view of breast
You may have two incisions. One will be near the tumor site. The other may be under the arm, near the lymph nodes.

Before Surgery

A week or more before the procedure, you will have an exam and routine tests. Before surgery:

  • Sign any consent forms.

  • Tell your healthcare provider about any medications, herbs, or supplements that you are taking.

  • Avoid eating or drinking for 8-12 hours before your surgery.

  • Arrange for a trusted adult to drive you home after surgery.

  • Bring a soft shirt that buttons in front to wear home.

  • Talk to the anesthesia care provider. He or she will explain how you will be kept free of pain during surgery.

During Surgery

Your surgeon will make an incision near the tumor site. The tumor and a surrounding margin of normal tissue will be removed. A second incision may also be made under the arm to remove some of the nearby axillary lymph nodes. These are checked to see if the cancer has spread to them. When the surgery is finished, the incisions will be closed using stitches.

When to Call Your Doctor

Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following after surgery:

  • Fever of 101.0°F or higher

  • Increased pain, warmth, drainage, swelling, or redness at the incision

  • Cough or shortness of breath

  • Pain in the chest or calf

  • Bleeding that soaks the dressing

Right After Surgery

You will wake up in the recovery room. You may have an IV (intravenous) line for fluids and medications. Pain medications will be given to you as needed. A nurse will check your temperature, pulse, and blood pressure. You'll likely go home the same day.

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2005-08-01T00:00:00-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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