Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Common Hormone Therapy Programs For WomenProgramas comunes de terapia hormonal para mujeres

Common Hormone Therapy Programs for Women

Which hormones you take and when you take them is called your hormone therapy (HT) program, or regimen. Your program is tailored for you, based on certain factors. These factors include whether you have a uterus and what your risk of cancer is. Whether or not you have reached menopause is also a factor. Note that there are both risks and benefits to HT. Discuss these with your doctor before starting an HT program.

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Some Common HTP rograms

Cyclic Estrogen and Progestin

You take estrogen all month and progestin about half the month. This method is based on a normal menstrual cycle. You will have some of the same symptoms, such as bleeding. This program helps reduce your risk of uterine cancer.

Combined Continuous

You take a lower dose of progestin. Both estrogen and progestin are taken each day of the month. You're likely to have the symptoms of a menstrual cycle. And you still reduce your risk of uterine cancer. But symptoms may be present during the entire cycle.

Combined Continuous with a Break

You take 5-7 days off before estrogen and progestin each month. This method also helps reduce the risk of uterine cancer. You may have less irregular bleeding with this program.

Unopposed Estrogen

Estrogen is prescribed by itself. This is most likely if you have had a hysterectomy. You may also use this option if you still have a uterus. But you will need yearly tests to check for uterine cancer.

Combined Estrogen and Androgens

Estrogen is combined with hormones called androgens. This option may be prescribed if your symptoms are not controlled by estrogen alone.

For Perimenopause

Birth control pills may be prescribed if you are close to menopause and starting to have symptoms. These pills control the menstrual cycle. You will still have monthly bleeding.

Publication Source: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Publication Source: Women's Health.gov

Online Source: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Online Source: Women's Health.gov

Date Last Reviewed: 2005-10-04T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2006-02-01T00:00:00-07:00

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