Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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"As always my visit was pleasant, I always feel as if I am visiting with long time friends when I am in the office . Dr Miller listens and explains thoroughly and I never feel rushed or ignored"


Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Osteoporosis: Understanding Bone LossOsteoporosis: La p©rdida de hueso

Osteoporosis: Understanding Bone Loss

The body has a natural system for maintaining bone. Understanding this system can help you learn how to maintain your bones.

A Balanced System Supports the Body

The body is always making and losing (resorbing) bone. This process is called remodeling. Bone-making cells form new bone using calcium and other minerals. These minerals come from the food you eat. Bone-resorbing cells take bone apart. They do this so the minerals can be used to repair an injury or make new bone. When this bone-making system is in balance, the same amount of bone is built and resorbed.

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An Unbalanced System Can't Give Support

Changes in hormone levels, activity, medications, or diet can affect the bone-making system. When the system gets out of balance, the amount of bone lost is greater than the amount of bone made. This can cause osteopenia (when bone starts to become less dense). Left untreated, bone loss gets worse, leading to osteoporosis. Weak bones can't support the body. In fact, they can fracture just from the weight of your body. This often happens in vertebrae (bones of the spine). When vertebrae fracture, parts of the spine compress. This causes the back to bend or hump over.

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Publication Source: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Online Source: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2004-05-03T00:00:00-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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