Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Gestational Diabetes: After PregnancyDiabetes gestacional: Despu©s del embarazo

Gestational Diabetes: After Pregnancy

Your blood sugar will most likely return to normal after delivery. But gestational diabetes is a warning sign that you are at risk of getting diabetes later in life. You're also more likely to have gestational diabetes with your next pregnancy. But you can take steps to reduce these risks.

Taking Care of Yourself

Even if your blood sugar goes back to normal, you still need to take care of yourself. This will help prevent diabetes later in life.

  • Keep your weight down. Eating food that is low in fat and sugar can help you control your weight. If you're overweight, your risk of getting diabetes in 10 to 15 years more than doubles. Keeping your weight down also reduces your risk of having gestational diabetes with your next pregnancy.

  • Get regular exercise. Exercise helps lower your blood sugar. It can also help you control your weight.

  • Have your blood sugar checked. Make an appointment to have your blood sugar checked 6 to 8 weeks after delivery.

  • Have regular diabetes screenings. Get checked every year, or as often as your healthcare provider advises.

Breastfeeding

Breast milk is the best food for your baby. Breastfeeding may also help lower your blood sugar. Your healthcare provider can show you how to breastfeed. Be sure to eat healthy foods and drink extra water while you're breastfeeding.

Planning Future Pregnancies

Your blood sugar needs to be back to normal before you get pregnant again. Have your blood sugar checked before you plan your next pregnancy. And remember that it's possible to get pregnant again soon after delivery. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best method of birth control for you and your partner.

 

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2006-12-22T00:00:00-07:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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