Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Nutrition While BreastfeedingLa alimentaci³n mientras est¡ amamantando

Nutrition While Breastfeeding

Your body needs fuel to make breastmilk, so eat your fill of a variety of foods. Breastfeeding isn't an excuse to eat and drink everything you want, but it's not a reason to avoid favorite foods either. When choosing foods, use the nutrition chart below as a guide.

REMEMBER: alcohol, cigarettes, and drugs also affect your breastmilk and your baby.

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Bread, cereal, rice, and pasta (eat 6-7 servings a day)

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Vegetables (eat 3-5 servings a day)

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Fruit (eat 2-4 servings a day)

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Milk, yogurt, and cheese (eat 2-3 servings a day)

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Meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts (eat 5-7 servings a day)

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Fats, oils, and sweets (use sparingly)

What's Good for You

  • Drink 8 ounces of liquid, such as water or diluted juice, every time you feed the baby. Your body needs this fluid to make milk.

  • Be sure to eat breads, leafy vegetables, and fruits, as well as milk products, meats, and fish.

  • Snack on fruit or low-fat dairy products if you're hungry between meals.

  • If your health care provider recommends it, keep taking prenatal vitamins.

What's Not

  • Some foods are best eaten in limited quantities. Those high in saturated fats, such as butter and bacon, fall into this category.

  • Be aware that what enters your body passes into your breastmilk. Limit caffeine-which is not just in coffee but is also in cola, tea, and chocolate.

  • Don't take medications of any type, unless your doctor says it's okay. This includes aspirin.

Publication Source: La Leche League

Publication Source: StorkNet

Online Source: La Leche League

Online Source: StorkNet

Date Last Reviewed: 2005-10-26T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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