Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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"As always my visit was pleasant, I always feel as if I am visiting with long time friends when I am in the office . Dr Miller listens and explains thoroughly and I never feel rushed or ignored"


Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

If You Need Insulin During PregnancySi necesita insulina durante el embarazo

If You Need Insulin During Pregnancy

Your body may not be able to make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar under control during pregnancy. If this happens, you'll need to take extra insulin. Taking insulin helps control your blood sugar without harming your baby. Insulin is a natural substance and is not addictive. You will most likely be able to stop taking insulin after your baby is born.

Learning to Take Insulin

Your healthcare provider will prescribe your insulin. You will need to inject it one or more times a day. Insulin is injected into fatty tissue. It does not cross the placenta. That means it does not affect your baby the way taking a pill would. Your healthcare provider will teach you how to give yourself a shot. With practice, you'll get comfortable doing it yourself.

Finding the Right Dosage for You

Your healthcare provider will work with you to find the right dosage of insulin for you. This may take time. That's because you need to balance your insulin with your food and exercise. Your body's need for insulin also increases as your baby grows. To be sure your insulin is working properly, you'll need to check your blood sugar several times a day. If your blood sugar is too high or too low, your healthcare provider will adjust your insulin.

Low Blood Sugar

Taking insulin puts you at risk of low blood sugar. Always treat low blood sugar right away.

  • Symptoms of low blood sugar include shakiness,

    dizziness, weakness, and confusion.

  • If you feel any of these symptoms, check your blood sugar right away.

  • To treat low blood sugar, eat 15 grams of fast-acting sugar (see below). Check your blood sugar again in 15 minutes. If your blood sugar is still low, eat another 15 grams of sugar.

  • If your blood sugar does not return to target range in 30 minutes, call your healthcare provider.

15 Grams of fast-acting sugar equals:

  • 3 glucose tablets

  • 5-6 pieces of hard candy

  • 1-2 tablespoons of honey or sugar

  • 1/2 cup fruit juice or regular (non-diet) soda

  • 1 cup fat-free milk

 

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2007-10-23T00:00:00-06:00

See for yourself how we can make a difference in your health and your life. Call Dr. Gail Miller at 708.430.2020 or use our convenient Request an Appointment form.

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