Gail Miller Ob/Gyn

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708.430.2020

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"As always my visit was pleasant, I always feel as if I am visiting with long time friends when I am in the office . Dr Miller listens and explains thoroughly and I never feel rushed or ignored"


Meet Your OB/GYN Specialist

Private Practice: Since 1980 to the present
Board-Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fellowship: Infertility, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
Residency: Ob/Gyn, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL and
Mt. Sinai Hospital, Chicago, IL
MD: University of Health Sciences Chicago Medical School
Instructor: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christ Community Hospital,
MacNeal Memorial Hospital and Palos Community Hospital
Dr. Miller

Things to Do and Don’t During Pregnancy

In a segment on CBS News, American Baby magazine’s lifestyle editor Jessica Hartshorn gives a lowdown on the do’s and don’ts during pregnancy.

Before, expecting moms aged 35 or older were the only ones who needed to be screened for birth defects. Today, age doesn’t matter. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists announced that all women should undergo screenings to check for various problems. Ideally, you should discuss your pregnancy state with your doctor.

The common thinking in the past was that pregnant women are eating for two. That isn’t exactly true. In fact, packing on too much weight can cause complications. Think hypertension and gestational diabetes. Women don’t need to gain too much weight to have a healthy baby. An extra 100 calories in the first trimester and 300 by the third is all that is required for the baby inside mommy’s tummy.

Pregnant women are supposed to exercise yet keep a heart rate below 140, right? No. Women can freely work out without risking the baby inside. However, you should be conscious of your breathing. If you can talk without huffing and puffing, you’re OK. Aim for a 30-minute, low-impact exercise five days a week. But safety first; always seek your doctor’s green light before doing any exercise.

Coffee was a big no-no back then. But now, doctors say preggies can gulp coffee in moderation. Caffeine at safe and reasonable amounts doesn’t cause miscarriage. However, doctors advise: Limit caffeine levels below 200 milligrams daily. That’s about the same as a 12-ounce cappuccino.

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